Jon Hanford

  • Group Chief Technology Officer

    Predictions are difficult, but an easy one to make is that in three to five years, many of today’s hot topics will have vaporised or transformed.

    Jon Hanford

    • Group Chief Technology Officer

      Born in London, UK, Jon grew fascinated with computers from an early age. In his early teens, he remembers when microcomputers first launched – a move that interested him way beyond the surface level. “They were very expensive back then,” he says, “so I ended up making one from a kit and soldering it together.”

      He didn’t stop there, with programming becoming an unshakeable hobby alongside the rock band he played in at the time. “Back in those days, if you wanted to play a game on your computer, you pretty much had to write it yourself,” he says.

      He began his career filing tapes as a temp at the BBC, before finding the opportunity to follow his passion within the company to become a Software Engineer. There, he joined workshops where he was one of the first to learn how to produce computer-led TV graphics, a field then in its infancy. He stayed with the company for almost 20 years in total, working in various roles which centred on the emergence of internet technology. He became Head of Technology for Sport and then Senior Technical Architect, Sport & 2012.

      Joining Deltatre as Technology Director in 2011, he has supported some of the world’s most-watched sport events, including London 2012, UEFA Champions Leagues, and tennis tournaments at Wimbledon.

      During his time at the company, he’s stressed the importance of not simply understanding the technology – but also the people that work with it, and use it. Whether it’s liaising with clients, internal teams, or remembering the end-user, “bridging the gap” between technology and people has always been an integral part of any successful project.

      And today, as Group Chief Technical Officer, it’s his role to ensure all projects across sport and technology are delivered smoothly using cutting edge technology. What are his biggest predictions when it comes to how technology will develop over the coming years? “Predictions are difficult,” he says, “but an easy one to make is that in three to five years, many of today’s hot topics will have vaporised or transformed.” In other words, the only thing to be certain of is change.

      Outside of work, he is a big fan of cricket and cycling. He also enjoys taking regular road trips around Europe.

      Predictions are difficult, but an easy one to make is that in three to five years, many of today’s hot topics will have vaporised or transformed.

      01

      Key Stats

      4K

      CDs and records owned

      4

      Continents visited for work

      15

      Olympic Games worked on

      6K

      Miles on road trips annually

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